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Morning Pointe of Franklin (IN) residents continue their tradition of raising baby chicks.

The senior living community started the project three years ago, inspired by the memories of residents who spent their days on the farm. Recalling the raising of livestock, canning and working in the fields, the seniors decided to bring home the little fluffy reminders of farm life.

Throughout the year, the residents take a trip to the local Rural King or Tractor Supply, bringing home six chickens at a time, and placing them in a chicken coop built especially for the senior living community.

Max Eubanks, Blanche Eilert and Donna King, Morning Pointe of Franklin residents, love to lend a helping hand tending to our chickens. Their bedding is changed on a regular basis as well as the water and food.

Max Eubanks, Blanche Eilert and Donna King, Morning Pointe of Franklin residents, love to lend a helping hand tending to our chickens. Their bedding is changed on a regular basis as well as the water and food.

Max Eubanks, Blanche Eilert and Donna King, Morning Pointe of Franklin residents, love to lend a helping hand tending to our chickens. Their bedding is changed on a regular basis as well as the water and food.


All able hands take turns take turns cleaning, feeding and visiting the chicks that the residents and their family members — especially the grandkids — associates and volunteers truly enjoy.

When the chicks grow up and become independent — a six-week process called “birding” — they go to Kathy Robinson, a local Franklin resident who enjoys raising bigger chickens.

Then the process begins all over again, bringing new baby chicks and repeating the cycle of nurture and care.

Mary Beth Piland, Life Enrichment Director at Morning Pointe of Franklin, says the time spent cuddling and caring for the baby chicks brightens everyone’s day.

“I realize how important something as simple as a little chicken brings such joy to the residents,” Piland says.

Photo: Residents at Morning Pointe of Franklin hold chicks from their community chicken coop.